Biggest Celebrities

21 of the Biggest Celebrities Who Died in 2021

From Oscar winners and TV icons to Broadway’s giant in the sky.

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In 2021 we had to say goodbye to many of the biggest celebrities. The biggest celebrities who made our world more beautiful with their art. Some of these biggest celebrities died of coronation, others for other reasons. Here are the names of some of the biggest celebrities to pay their respects to.

In 2021, there never seemed to be enough time with those we lost. Some beloved stars left us while at the top of their professional game—Michael K. Williams received his fifth Emmy nomination shortly before his death; Willie Garson passed while reviving his beloved Sex and the City character. And theater giant Stephen Sondheim died just days before an updated West Side Story—his first major musical as lyricist—opened to critical adoration. In chronological order, here are 21 stars who died in 2021 who made their mark with every minute.

 

Tanya Roberts

 

Tanya Roberts

Twenty-four hours after her death was prematurely announced, the Bond Girl and That ’70s Show star died on January 4 at age 65 of a urinary tract infection that spread to her kidney, gallbladder, liver, and blood stream. 

 

Larry King

 

Larry King

One Of The biggest Celebrities is Larry King. King became known for his probing interview style on CNN’s Larry King Live, talking to thousands of high-profile figures during his 25-year tenure, including Oprah Winfrey, Marlon Brando, and Vladimir Putin. He died of sepsis at age 87 in the weeks after being hospitalized for COVID-19. 

 

Hal Holbrook

 

Hal Holbrook

Holbrook, who played memorable historical figures in All the President’s Men and Lincoln, died in his Beverly Hills home on January 23. The 95-year-old won a Tony for his one-man show Mark Twain Tonight! in 1966 and at age 82 became the then-oldest Oscar nominee in the best-supporting-actor category for his performance in 2007’s Into the Wild. 

 

Cloris Leachman 

 

Cloris Leachman

Leachman died on January 27 at age 94 after seven decades spent in Hollywood. Over the course of her illustrious life, she won an Oscar in 1972 for best supporting actress in The Last Picture Show and earned two of her eight career Emmys for The Mary Tyler Moore Show. We have to say good by to one of biggest celebrirties. 

 

Cicely Tyson

 

Cicely Tyson

An Other biggest celebrities is Cicely Tyson. “Ms. Cicely Tyson is elegance personified. She is excellence. She is courage. When I think of her, I think of the Stevie Wonder song: ‘Show me how to do like you. Show me how to do it,” Viola Davis wrote of Tyson, who died on January 28 at age 96, for Vanity Fair in 2019. Over the course of her celebrated career, Tyson was honored with a Tony, three Emmys, and an honorary Academy Award. She passed away just days after releasing her memoir, Just As I Am.

 

Dustin Diamond

 

Dustin Diamond

Best known for playing the geeky Samuel “Screech” Powers on Saved by the Bell and two of its follow-up series, Saved by the Bell: The New Class and Saved by the Bell: The College Years, Diamond died on February 1 at age 44 of lung cancer. 

 

Christopher Plummer

 

Christopher Plummer

Plummer, who died at age 91 on February 5, spent six decades in Hollywood, with roles ranging from Capt. von Trapp in The Sound of Music to Harlan Thrombey in Knives Out. He reached the height of his power in later years; all three of his best-supporting-actor nods came after age 80—in 2010 for The Last Station, 2012 for Beginners (for which he became the then-oldest person ever to win an Oscar), and in 2018 for All the Money in the World. 

 

George Segal

 

George Segal

One of the biggest celebirities is George Segal. Segal, who earned an Oscar nomination for Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and spent his final years on ABC’s The Goldbergs, died on March 23 of complications from bypass surgery at age 87. In the 1970s, Segal excelled in comedies—starring alongside Barbra Streisand in 1970’s The Owl and the Pussycat and co-leading 1977’s Fun With Dick and Jane next to Jane Fonda.

 

Jessica Walter

 

Jessica Walter

The Emmy-winning actor, known for exuberant performances in Arrested Development and Archer, died on March 24 at age 80. 

 

Larry McMurtry

 

Larry McMurtry

The Pulitzer Prize–winning novelist and Oscar-winning screenwriter passed away on March 25 of heart failure at age 84. He adapted his own prolific writing into films and TV shows including Brokeback Mountain, Lonesome Dove, Terms of Endearment, and The Last Picture Show. 

 

Olympia Dukakis

 

Olympia Dukakis

Dukakis, known for Steel Magnolias and her Oscar-winning performance as Rose Castorini in Moonstruck, passed away on May 1 at age 89.

 

Ned Beatty

 

Ned Beatty

A prolific character actor known for Deliverance and Network (for which he earned a best-supporting-actor Oscar nomination), Beatty died of natural causes on June 13 at age 83.

 

Richard Donner

 

Richard Donner

Donner, the Hollywood director and producer responsible for the original Superman, Lethal Weapon, and The Goonies, died on July 5 at age 91.

 

Ed Asner

 

Ed Asner

Boasting more than 400 credits on IMDB, Asner made his mark with numerous iconic film and TV roles, including Lou Grant on The Mary Tyler Moore Show (and his own titular spinoff), Santa in Elf, and the voice of Carl in Up, to name a select few. Asner, who won seven Emmys and five Golden Globes, died on August 29 at age 91. 

 

Michael K. Williams

 

Michael K. Williams

The five-time Emmy nominee, who delivered indelible performances on TV series like Boardwalk Empire, Lovecraft Country, and The Wire, died of a suspected overdose at age 54. Two weeks later, he lost his fifth and final Emmy to The Crown’s Tobias Menzies, who dedicated the award to Williams. 

 

Norm Macdonald

 

Norm Macdonald

Macdonald, who spent five years behind the Weekend Update desk at Saturday Night Live in the 1990s, died at age 61 after a private nine-year cancer battle. Post-SNL, Macdonald headlined his own comedy series, The Norm Show, and became a mainstay on late-night TV, with Seth Meyers calling him “the gold standard.”

 

Willie Garson

 

Willie Garson

In the midst of reviving his Sex and the City character Stanford Blatch, best friend to Sarah Jessica Parker’s Carrie Bradshaw, Garson died of cancer at age 57. Parker, who filmed three episodes of the SATC revival, And Just Like That…, with Garson prior to his death, wrote of her co-star: “Your absence a crater that I will fill with blessing of these memories and all the ones that are still in recesses yet to surface.”

 

Peter Scolari

 

Peter Scolari

Scolari, a revered actor of the stage and screen, died on October 22 at age 66 after a two-year battle with cancer. He got his start in TV alongside Tom Hanks in Bosom Buddies before co-starring with Bob Newhart in Newhart and winning a 2016 Emmy for his recurring guest-actor role on Girls. 

 

James Michael Tyler

 

James Michael Tyler

Four months after disclosing his stage IV prostate cancer diagnosis, Tyler died on October 24 at age 59. He was best known for appearing in a whopping 150 episodes of Friends as the ubiquitous Central Perk barista Gunther.

 

Stephen Sondheim

 

Stephen Sondheim

One of the most influential figures in musical theater died on November 26 at age 91. The landmark composer and lyricist created iconic musicals including Sunday in the Park With George, Into the Woods, Company, and Sweeney Todd. At the time of the Tony and Pulitzer Prize winner’s death, a revival of Company played on Broadway and a production of Assassins off Broadway, while Steven Spielberg’s remake of West Side Story was about to hit theaters.

 

Anne Rice

 

Anne Rice

The bestselling author, who had seven of her novels adapted for the screen, including 1994’s Interview With a Vampire, died on December 11 at age 80 due to complications from a stroke. 

 

Source:

Vanityfair

 

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